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We understand the importance of leaving a legacy.  LAS has built a reputation as the premier legal services provider in the country, defending the basic rights of children and families across our communities. Now, you can build on that legacy.

By making a Legacy Gift, you will grow the impact of your support, offering life-changing assistance to those who need it the most. With your Legacy Gift, you will be helping New Yorker for years to come. We invite you to read more about the ways in which you can grow your impact today.

 

To discuss Legacy Giving, please contact:
Sharon Kleinhandler, Director of Development
Phone: 212.577.3987
Email: skleinhandler@legal-aid.org
The Legal Aid Society
Development Office
199 Water Street
New York, NY 10038

 

Will or Trust

Many Legal Aid Society supporters choose to leave a donation in their wills and trusts as an important way to have long-term impact, without any upfront cost during their lifetimes. Making a will is one of the most impactful ways to extend your love and generosity for your family and friends. It can also help deserving New Yorkers in need.

By leaving a gift to The Legal Aid Society in your will or trust, you are building a powerful legacy of equal justice.

Create a will in less than 25 minutes by visiting Freewill.com/legalaidsociety.

If you’d prefer to go straight to an attorney to draft your will and you choose to leave a gift in your will,
we suggest the following language and to advise us of your intentions:

“I bequeath (amount OR percentage) to Legal Aid Society, a nonprofit corporation organized and existing under the laws of New York, with the principal business address of 199 Water Street, New York, NY 10038 and federal tax identification number 13-5562265.”

Contact us with any questions: Sharon Kleinhandler, skleinhandler@legal-aid.org

Note: In your Will or Trust, you may leave to The Legal Aid Society a specific dollar amount, specific items of tangible personal property (such as artwork, antiques, or jewelry), interests in real property, or all or a portion of the residue of your estate (remaining after payment of other dispositions, taxes, and expenses). The estate tax burden on your estate may be reduced as a result of the charitable deduction available to your estate for the value of the property passing to LAS.

 

Life Insurance/Retirement Assets

You may inquire about making The Legal Aid Society a beneficiary of an insurance policy
on your life or of your IRA or other retirement account upon your passing. 

Note: If The Legal Aid Society is a designated beneficiary of your life insurance or of your IRA or other retirement account upon your death, the estate tax burden on your estate may be reduced as a result of the charitable deduction available to your estate for the full amount of the insurance proceeds or the value of the property held in your IRA, or retirement account passing to LAS . To leave life insurance to LAS, please contact your insurance agent or insurance company. To leave an IRA or a retirement account to LAS, please contact your plan administrator or account custodian.

 

Bank and Brokerage Accounts

You may inquire about leaving bank accounts, certificates of deposit or securities accounts directly to The Legal Aid Society. 

Note: A charitable deduction will be available to your estate for the value of an account passing to LAS. To arrange such a gift, please contact your bank or broker to obtain the necessary forms.

 

Real Property

You may inquire about giving The Legal Aid Society real estate or a remainder interest in your residence effective after you and your spouse are deceased.

Note: You and your spouse may retain the right to live in your home for your lifetimes, after which your home would pass to The Legal Aid Society. You can claim a current income tax charitable deduction for the present value of the remainder interest which will pass to LAS in the future. In addition, a charitable deduction will be available to our estate for the value of the remainder interest passing to LAS please contact your attorney.