Statement On Heat, Hot Water Service Interruptions At NYCHA Rangel, Hammel, And Whitman Developments

Judith Goldiner, Attorney-In-Charge of the Civil Law Reform Unit at The Legal Aid Society, issued the following statement today responding to heat and/or hot water service interruptions at Rangel, Hammel, and Whitman New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) developments impacting 4,108 individuals:

“It is disappointing but not surprising that on the first frigid day of the year, four-thousand NYCHA tenants are suffering unplanned heat and hot water outages. This is a breach of law; and every time the City fails to provide these mandatory utilities, there needs to be some consequence. This is the reality in private dwellings, and it should be no different in public housing. Today is not a promising start, and we hope that the City is equipped to avoid a reprise of last year’s nightmare.”

Legal Aid Society Statement on Latest Nunez Independent Monitor Report on Abuse in New York City Jails

Mary Lynne Werlwas, Director of the Prisoners’ Rights Project at The Legal Aid Society, released the below statement today responding to a report from Steve J. Martin, independent Federal Court-appointed Monitor in Nunez v. City of New York et. al., concerning misuse of force in New York City jails. The independent Monitor was appointed by the Court after Legal Aid, private firms and the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York settled a lawsuit against the City demanding that the Department of Correction meaningfully address the scourge of excessive force that has long been entrenched in Rikers Island and other City jails.

“Three years ago, the City committed to faithfully and fully investigate brutality by corrections staff against people held in our City jails, and stop relying on sham investigations to exonerate gross staff misconduct. The report of the Nunez Monitor shows the City has utterly failed. Investigations are biased, ignore clear evidence of staff wrongdoing and take years to complete. Officers get away with the same boilerplate excuses; supervisors tasked with investigations sign off on bogus accounts of egregious behavior; and the DOC Investigation Division has neither the staff nor experience to conduct professional investigations in any reasonable time. The hard work of the many correction officers who seek to make the jails safer and more humane is undermined by this culture of impunity. Meanwhile, the use of force practices the City committed to reform remain entrenched, with use of force rates worse than at any time since the Nunez commitments were made.

The report also raises alarms for the 16 and 17 year-olds moved off Rikers under “Raise the Age,” since the City has chosen to rely on DOC staff in the new facility. In the first six months of 2018, DOC staff used more force against these children than ever before, increasing the level of violence in the build up to this move. Raise the Age was not intended to move this unsafe and unstable operation to a new building, but rather to adopt a developmentally appropriate, rehabilitative approach for these children. The City should intervene swiftly to ensure that DOC use of force practices are not replicated in the new facility.”

Read the full report (PDF).

Legal Aid's 2018 Pro Bono Publico Awards Ceremony

 Tina Luongo, Attorney-in-Charge of the Criminal Defense Practice; Adriene Holder, Attorney-in-Charge of the Civil Practice; Sharon Katz, Special Counsel for Pro Bono at Davis, Polk & Wardwell LLP; Daniel Kolb, Senior Counsel at Davis, Polk & Wardwell LLP and a Vice Chair of The Legal Aid Society; Richard J. Davis, Chair of The Legal Aid Society; the Honorable Rolando T. Acosta, Presiding Justice , Appellate Division, First Department Dawne Mitchell, Attorney-in-Charge of the Juvenile Rights Practice; Marie Ndiaye, Supervising Attorney of the Decarceration Project; Elizabeth Bender, Staff Attorney, Decarceration Project; and Joshua Norkin, Staff Attorney, Decarceration Project.

Tina Luongo, Attorney-in-Charge of the Criminal Defense Practice; Adriene Holder, Attorney-in-Charge of the Civil Practice; Sharon Katz, Special Counsel for Pro Bono at Davis, Polk & Wardwell LLP; Daniel Kolb, Senior Counsel at Davis, Polk & Wardwell LLP and a Vice Chair of The Legal Aid Society; Richard J. Davis, Chair of The Legal Aid Society; the Honorable Rolando T. Acosta, Presiding Justice , Appellate Division, First Department Dawne Mitchell, Attorney-in-Charge of the Juvenile Rights Practice; Marie Ndiaye, Supervising Attorney of the Decarceration Project; Elizabeth Bender, Staff Attorney, Decarceration Project; and Joshua Norkin, Staff Attorney, Decarceration Project.

The Legal Aid Society hosted the 2018 Pro Bono Publico Awards Ceremony Wednesday evening.  Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP received the 2018 Honorable Jonathan Lippman New York Pro Bono Publico & Public Service Law Firm Award.  Law Firms and individual lawyers were recognized for outstanding public service.  Special awards were presented to Attorneys Emeritus who provide pro bono representation to Legal Aid clients throughout the five boroughs.

Police Reform Advocates Call on NYPD to Fire Staten Island Officer After Brutal Arrest of Local Man With Disabilities

 Christopher Pisciotta, attorney-in-charge of Legal Aid's Staten Island Criminal Defense Practice speaking.

Christopher Pisciotta, attorney-in-charge of Legal Aid's Staten Island Criminal Defense Practice speaking.

The Legal Aid Society; Sonia Adorno – mother of William Colon; The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People - Staten Island Branch; Communities United For Police Reform (CPR); Make The Road New York; the Association of Legal Aid Attorneys UAW Local 2325; and other stakeholders gathered outside Staten Island Criminal Court today calling on the New York City Police Department (NYPD) to terminate Officer Vincenzo Trabolse.

Office Trabolse was recently involved in the violent arrest of William Colon, a 24-year-old Staten Island man with severe medical issues. The arrest was caught on video, and shows Trabolse repeatedly punching Colon and using a taser on him while he was in handcuffs. Mr. Colon has no criminal record. He suffers from several health issues connected to diabetes, including Mauriac Syndrome (he is 4’8” and 85 pounds), GERD, scoliosis, asthma, and other conditions.

“It’s been more than two weeks since Officer Trabolse brutalized William in his own home. The NYPD must make it clear that brute force of this nature will not be tolerated,” said Chris Pisciotta, Attorney-In-Charge of the Staten Island Criminal Defense Practice at The Legal Aid Society. “Given William’s medical conditions, this attack could have been fatal. Trabolse should not be allowed to wear the badge, walk the beat, and continue to endanger the lives of other New Yorkers. We call on the NYPD to terminate his employment immediately.”


Sonia Adorno, mother of William Colon, speaking.

“No mother should bear the horrific sight of her child being manhandled by the police over a crime that he did not commit,” said Sonia Adorno, mother of William Colon. “The police are supposed to protect and serve, and their assault on William breaks that promise. Staten Island is no safer with Officer Trabolse walking the streets. The NYPD must hold him accountable.”

Trabolse and fellow officers are also being accused by the complainant in this arrest of coercion for pressuring her into signing a misdemeanor assault complaint that alleges that Colon had punched her.

The entire incident is currently being investigated by the Internal Affairs Bureau (IAB), the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), and the Staten Island District Attorney’s Office. Trabolse was previously named in a lawsuit involving the alleged assault of a man with cerebral palsy.

"The members of our union stand squarely behind Mr. Colon and all victims of police brutality," said Deborah Wright, President of the Association of Legal Aid Attorneys - UAW Local 2325. "In the courts we see all too often the same pattern of police misconduct, coercion of community members, and continued impunity. The NYPD must hold Officer Trabolse accountable and end its pervasive policy of heavy handed policing in Staten Island and across the city."

"Despite the NYPD's massive re-branding Build the Block an Neighborhood Policing campaigns, the reality is we know that in our communities, they continue to abuse their power and brutalize and harass us with impunity. This is not simply a matter of bad apples, the tree is rotten. Officer Trabolse and the other officers present must be held accountable and should not be walking the streets and interacting with our community members. Officer Trabolse needs to be fired immediately and all other officers involved should be held accountable for standing by and watching a defenseless person beat in their own home,” said Darian X, Community Safety and Justice Organizer with Make The Road New York.

“The Staten Island Branch of the NAACP stands with the Legal Aid Society and others in front of this courthouse on Central Ave in Staten Island. This courthouse represents the place where justice is rendered. We are here seeking justice in the police brutality case involving 24-year-old William Colon who stands 4’ 10” and weighs about 80 pounds and physically does not appear to be a harm to a group of police officers while in hand cuffs. It would appear that the police officers had control of the situation. I would ask a question why would Police Officer Vincenzo Trabolse find it necessary to continue to punch Mr. Colon while in handcuffs and then taser him to the point that he could not stand up-------why because Trbolse who has similar issues against and does not appear to have the understanding to be a good police officer should be removed of his duty as a police officer with the NYPD. It has been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. It has been reported in the news media that the police were wearing body cameras. The news media has also shown video’s taken by Mr. Colon’s Brother of the brutality imposed on William. The video’s show the brother telling the police of the many health issues William is dealing with. The SI Branch of the NAACP is asking the District Attorney and the NYPD for a quick investigation and remove Vincent Trabolse from the NYPD,” said Ed Josey, President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People – Staten Island Branch.

Latinx Hispanic Heritage Spotlight: Immigration Law Unit

The Legal Aid Society has a long-standing history of working with and advocating for New York City’s most marginalized communities. Due to increased violence in the Central American Northern Triangle and the increase of anti-immigrant and racist policies coming from the Trump administration, immigrant communities, particularly the Hispanic and Latinx families have been disproportionately impacted. The Legal Aid Society’s Immigration Law Unit has been on the front lines responding to these emergent issues. The case stories below highlight how we have worked to fight for and defend at-risk individuals and families in the Hispanic and Latinx communities.

Ms. B

Ms. B is a single mother with a young daughter who arrived in the United States in January 2017 after being threatened with gang violence and extortion by gang members in Honduras. Ms. B was specifically targeted because she is Garifuna, which is a marginalized ethnic group that is discriminated against in Honduras. As the only single Garifuna woman working and living in her town, Ms. B was subject to racial slurs and physical assault by gang members in retaliation for her refusal to pay extortion money. Within a few months of their arrival in the U.S., Ms. B and her daughter were referred to the Society for assistance by Central American Legal Assistance, and the Society filed an asylum application in January 2018 on behalf of Ms. B and her daughter based on the danger they could face if they were forced to return to Honduras.

Robert

Robert is a 19-year-old from El Salvador who came to the U.S. in December 2016 seeking asylum at the border based on gang violence. As he was 17 years old at the time, he was designated an unaccompanied minor and placed into ORR custody.

After about a month in ORR custody, Robert was reunited with his mother and his older brother in the New York area. He attended ninth grade, went to all of his immigration court hearings, and began the process of applying for SIJS, a way for him to adjust to lawful permanent resident status based on the fact that he was abandoned by his biological father.

Without any notice or warning, ICE agents detained Robert in October 2017 and placed him into the Bergen County Jail pending his immigration court proceedings. LAS began representing Robert in January 2018 and immediately requested a bond hearing be scheduled for Robert's release. However, because DHS designated him as an arriving alien – a person who attempted to enter the U.S. at a port of entry without valid documents – the Immigration Judge found she had no jurisdiction to hold a bond hearing. Based on this decision, Robert's only option was to request parole from ICE. ICE denied Robert's request for parole, providing no reasoning for its decision. LAS appealed the denial of the parole request to the supervisor within ICE, but no response was ever received.

As Robert is a young man who suffered tremendously in detention for over six months without access to basic education or psychological support, all while being far away from his mother, LAS filed a habeas petition with the Southern District of New York requesting his release from custody. In June 2018, the Immigration Judge granted the habeas petition, finding that ICE's arrest in the absence of due process violated the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 and the Administrative Procedure Act , and that Robert's detention without a due process determination violated the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and ordering Robert's immediate release.

Robert is now living with his mother, has a pending asylum application with USCIS, and will soon be filing his petition for SIJS.

Abraham

For as long as he can remember, Abraham’s mother and father physically abused him – whether with tree branches or ropes or beating him by hand. He grew up believing that his parents did not love him. When his father left Honduras for the United States, Abraham’s mother continued the beatings. Finally, when he was 17, Abraham made the decision to leave Honduras and come to the United States to escape the abuse at home. He crossed the border as an unaccompanied minor and, after a month in an Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) shelter, he was released and he joined his older brother in New York State. His father was also living with his brother, but almost immediately after Abraham arrived, his father abandoned the brothers completely and returned to Honduras.

After a traffic accident, Abraham was arrested by ICE and held in detention at the Hudson County Correctional Facility. LAS filed an asylum application for Abraham and worked with him to help him articulate the horrific abuse he suffered at home in Honduras. LAS established at a hearing – through Abraham’s testimony, a declaration from his brother, the report of a psychologist who evaluated Abraham, and country conditions evidence about child abuse in Honduras – that Abraham’s abuse rose to the level of persecution and that he faced the possibility of future harm if he were deported. The Immigration Judge granted Abraham humanitarian asylum. After six months of detention, Abraham is now at home with his brother.

Celebrating Our Leaders During Latinx Hispanic Heritage Month

 Celebrating Latinx and Hispanic Heritage Month at The Legal Aid Society were (from left): Dawne Mitchell, Attorney-in-Charge of JRP; Sunny Santino Mirando of True 2 Life; Anabel Flores, a Paralegal Case Handler in Civil; Tina Luongo, Chief Defender, CDP; Anthony Posada, Supervising Attorney in the Community Justice Unit; Femi Disu-Oakley, Director of Diversity and Inclusion; Felix Polanco of True 2 Life; and Arlene Rivera, Staff Attorney in JRP.

Celebrating Latinx and Hispanic Heritage Month at The Legal Aid Society were (from left): Dawne Mitchell, Attorney-in-Charge of JRP; Sunny Santino Mirando of True 2 Life; Anabel Flores, a Paralegal Case Handler in Civil; Tina Luongo, Chief Defender, CDP; Anthony Posada, Supervising Attorney in the Community Justice Unit; Femi Disu-Oakley, Director of Diversity and Inclusion; Felix Polanco of True 2 Life; and Arlene Rivera, Staff Attorney in JRP.

Last night the Legal Aid Society honored their employees and community partners with an event titled, “LAS Leaders in the Latinx and Hispanic Communities.”  Arlene Rivera, Staff Attorney at the Juvenile Rights Practice; Anabel Flores, Paralegal Case handler in the Civil Practice and Anthony Posada, Supervising Attorney for the Community Justice Unit in the Criminal Defense Practice, shared their stories about the presence of resilience, courage, and strength in their communities.  They discussed their advocacy for their clients through criminal, juvenile, and immigration reform.  LAS was proud to host several community partners who also spoke at the event.  Alma Reyes, an organizer from El Comite De Justicia Social de San Leo; Felix Polanco and Sunny Santino Mirando, community partners from True 2 Life, all spoke about their commitment to empowering and advocating for Latinx and Hispanic communities.  This event was a reminder that there are true leaders at LAS and in the community “en la lucha” (in the fight) for justice.

The New York Law Journal
Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month Celebration at Legal Aid
By Staff
October 12, 2018

The Legal Aid Society commemorated Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month, recognizing the contributions made by its employees and partners.

The Legal Aid Society commemorated Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month at its office on Wednesday. Speakers Arlene Rivera, Anabel Flores and Anthony Posada discussed their work and leadership within The Legal Aid Society and how it impacts their communities. Felix Polanco and Sunny Santino Mirando of True 2 Life, an anti-violence program of Staten Island’s Central Family Life Center, a community partner of Legal Aid, also addressed the group.

Serving The Public Interest

allie cabbibo news.png

St. John’s Law Magazine | Serving The Public Interest

Since arriving at St. John’s Law on a St. Thomas More Scholarship, Allie Cabibbo has pursued a career in the public interest with laser-like focus.

As a 1L, she volunteered with the Civil Legal Advice and Resources Office to support its mission of assisting low-income New Yorkers being sued by debt collectors. She also earned a position on the executive board of the Law School’s Public Interest Center, which offers St. John’s Law students and alumni opportunities to help the underserved in and around New York City.

Receiving one of several Catalyst Public Service Fellowships awarded to St. John’s Law students, Cabibbo spent her 1L summer as a legal intern at the Urban Justice Center’s Mental Health Project. Then, during her second year at St. John’s, she broadened her public interest experience as a student advocate in the full-year Criminal Defense Clinic, assigned to The Legal Aid Society in Queens.

“I loved the work,” Cabibbo says. “Pursuant to a Student Practice Order, I carried my own caseload representing clients accused of misdemeanors and other minor offenses. I had all the duties of a criminal defense attorney, including client intake, arraignment, bail proceedings, discovery and motion practice, court appearances, hearings, plea negotiations, and trials.” As she navigated the hands-on learning at Legal Aid, Cabibbo had steadfast mentors. One was St. John’s Law alumna Maria Martinez, a staff attorney in the office’s Criminal Defense Practice.

Like Cabibbo, Martinez grew up in New York and, from an early age, was drawn to work in the public interest. “As far back as I can remember, I was interested in criminal law,” she says. “In high school, I attended a summer law program where we received a case file and prepared for a mock trial. I’ve been hooked on trial work ever since. When it came time to apply to law school, St. John’s was a natural choice. Its Vincentian mission is consistent with my personal philosophy of helping those who are poor, marginalized, and struggle to access justice.”

Also, like Cabibbo, Martinez participated in the Law School’s Criminal Defense Clinic and found it a formative experience. “Had it not been for the Clinic, I don’t think I would be where I am today,” she says. “The curriculum was comprehensive and engaging, and weekly lectures helped us connect what we were studying in class to real world law practice. In fact, I found my Clinic work so rewarding that I’ve basically been at Legal Aid ever since.”

As a Legal Aid staff attorney, Martinez provides holistic, client-centered representation to low-income New Yorkers facing misdemeanor, felony, and homicide charges. “I handle matters from arraignments through hearings and trials, working closely with other units in our office to help mitigate any collateral consequences my clients could face due to their arrest or conviction,” she explains. When presented with an opportunity to support Cabibbo during her time in the Criminal Defense Practice, Martinez didn’t hesitate.

“Mentoring Allie was one of my most rewarding experiences at Legal Aid to date,” she says. “She was high energy and always ready, willing, and able to dive into the work. She spent countless hours at arraignments with me, including Saturday nights. I may have given Allie some practical tools, but she sure put them to good use. Through her perseverance and amazing advocacy, she gained the trust and respect of her clients and the attorneys in our office. I consider her a colleague, and I know our connection— as lawyers in the public interest and as representatives of St. John’s Law—will remain strong.”

The connection to Martinez also endures for Cabibbo, who, as a St. John’s Law Summer Public Interest Fellow, returned to Legal Aid this past summer to work in its Consumer Law Project in Jamaica, Queens. “What I enjoyed most about Maria’s mentorship during my year in the Clinic was feeling comfortable being confused, confident in my representation despite being such a novice, and being able to be candid with my questions,” she says. “I always felt like my input mattered, and that I was part of the Legal Aid team.”

Cabibbo also appreciates that she and Martinez have St. John’s Law in common. “Alumni mentors are vital because law school can feel very abstract and legal practice can feel like a misty, distant shore,” she observes. “Getting to know an attorney, delving into their day-to-day work, and understanding their role in the immense legal community makes your own career feel more tangible and less mysterious. I don’t know how anyone could choose a career path without a mentor in the field, and I’m very grateful for Maria’s guidance as I chart mine.

Latinx Hispanic Heritage Spotlight: Community Justice Unit

 Anthony Posada, Supervising Attorney, Community Justice Unit

Anthony Posada, Supervising Attorney, Community Justice Unit

Since its inception in 2011, The Community Justice Unit (CJU) in the Criminal Defense Practice has worked with Cure Violence sites to combat gun violence and provide comprehensive legal services to enable healthier and safer communities. Their ongoing initiatives include community outreach, legal education, clinics, and trainings provided to the Cure Violence network. The Unit also advocates for and empowers families and communities by teaching them their rights in the criminal and civil contexts.

CJU provides immense support for black and brown communities all over New York City through education, outreach and advocacy. Through grassroots organization and advocacy the CJU is on the front lines fighting for accountability and transparency in the criminal justice system for Hispanic and Latinx community members who are victims of police brutality and misconduct. This was the case with 17 year old Jimmy Alvarado, who on May 21st, 2018 was paralyzed from the neck down by an NYPD officer during a police encounter in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.

On May 26th, Councilman Carlos Menchaca called on the city to release security camera footage of the police chase and encounter that left the teen paralyzed. The Community Justice Unit joined Council Member Menchaca alongside Jimmy Alvarado’s family and friends in solidarity demanding justice and transparency for the teenager. CJU also partnered with the grassroots group, El Grito De Sunset Park, a cop watch organization that documents police interactions in Sunset Park by helping them FOIL the NYPD for the video footage of the nearby cameras where the incident occurred.

Victor Dempsey, community advocate in the Community Justice Unit stated, “I’m out here today to stand in solidarity with the family and also the Sunset Park community…This has gone on far too many times where police have used excessive force and negligence. We want to help the family fight for justice.”

Statement on Trump Administration’s Final Proposed Changes to Public Charge

Hasan Shafiqullah, Attorney-In-Charge of the Immigration Law Unit at The Legal Aid Society, issued the following statement today responding to the Trump Administration’s final proposed changes to public charge:

“Today the Trump Administration issued a cruel proposed rule to further advance its war on immigrant families. The rule represents a brazen attempt to lay down the welcome mat for only the rich, while slamming the door on other immigrants. If adopted, the rule would dissuade immigrants who are here lawfully from accessing essential medical care and basic food assistance for their families. Simply put: the rule amounts to another attempt by the Trump Administration to tear families apart. As we have with other Trump administration attacks on immigrants - from the Muslim ban to its cruel child separation policy — we will continue to push back on these xenophobic policies that marginalize our clients and other New Yorkers.”

Legal Aid Files Lawsuit Seeking Court Appointed Administrator to Fix Dilapidated Building Due to Landlord Neglect

PHOTO: KEVIN CASE | OBSERVER

RESIDENTS HAVE BEEN WITHOUT COOKING GAS FOR NEARLY A YEAR; BUILDING HAS RACKED UP 249 OPEN VIOLATIONS WITH CITY

The Legal Aid Society’s Tenant Rights Coalition filed a 7A proceeding in Bronx Housing Court on behalf of 22 residents of 643 Southern Boulevard in the Bronx. The entire building has been without cooking gas service since October 2017, and as of October 1st, there are 249 Violations open New York City Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) violations for this 46 unit building. This includes 132 class B violations for hazardous conditions and 72 class C violations for immediately hazardous conditions. Among these are violations for lead paint, leaks, mold, mice, roaches, and other conditions affecting the security, safety and comfort of the tenants.

“This landlord has utterly failed to meet the basic responsibilities of being a landlord, and tenants have suffered for far too long. This landlord’s course of conduct would appear to be a calculated effort to deny tenants their rights and force them to leave their homes,” said Benjamin Seibel, Staff Attorney at The Legal Aid Society.

“Housing Court provides a remedy for this situation by ordering the building to be placed in the hands of a capable administrator who will actually use tenants’ hard-earned rent money to restore gas to the building and to make repairs so tenants can have the safe and habitable homes to which they are entitled under the law,” said Russell Crane, Staff Attorney at The Legal Aid Society.

“I do not have money to buy take-out food for my baby and the rest of my family since we cannot cook in our apartment. I am very worried about the lead paint that was found in my apartment that the landlord has not fixed,” said Jessenia Taberas, daughter of Modesta Gonzalez, a tenant who has lived in the building for fifteen years.

Despite separate litigation by HPD and the tenants over the past year to force the landlord to make repairs and restore gas service, the work has still not been done and the owners have not complied with the court’s orders or their settlement agreements. Tenants at the building have suffered without being able to properly prepare meals due to the lack of gas. This has especially impacted families with young children who have seen their food expenses soar and elderly tenants on special diets who cannot prepare healthy food.

In this new case, 22 tenants at the building are seeking a court order appointing an administrator to manage the building, collect rents, take out necessary loans and complete the repairs necessary to make the building and their individual apartments habitable.

The Respondents in the case are the owner Marquis Housing LLC, the head officer of that corporation, Lazer Kviat A/K/A/ Abraham Lazer Kviat, the managing agent Sam David, the mortgage holder New York Community Bank, and, pursuant to statutory requirements, the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

This year, the Owners took out a mortgage of more than $3 million on the property from New York Community Bank, yet tenants have continued to be left without basic services and repairs.

Tenants have also recently received notice that the landlord owes over $12,000 in unpaid bills to Con Edison, and the utility company is threatening further termination of services if the bill is not paid immediately.

The Legal Aid Society’s Tenant Rights Coalition is supported by the City’s Human Resource Administration (HRA).